A Song of Superwholock

This is a multi-fandom blog: Harry Potter, Doctor Who, Game of Thrones, The Hunger Games, The Avengers, Sherlock, Teen Wolf, John Green, Alias, The Vampire Diaries, Once Upon a Time, White Collar, Suits, His Dark Materials, Percy Jackson, The West Wing, Grey's Anatomy, Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit
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tinsnip:

teland:

rapiddescent:

Common wisdom has it that Tumblr is filled mostly with people in their  teens and early twenties. I keep seeing people talk about being “older than the average” Tumblr user and naturally, that makes me curious to know, well, how old is the average Tumblr user, really? Fortunately, other people are interested in this, too, and have already done some surveys. This data comes from Google Doubleclick Ad Planner data that has been available to advertisers. It is from 2012, but it probably hasn’t changed significantly since then. This data came from the United States only, and the demographics may vary somewhat in other countries. 

Tumblr skews toward the younger end of the social media world, but the average age of Tumblr users is actually 34.6 years old. This is only a little bit younger than the average age for social media users as a whole (36.9). The youngest Tumblr users (0-24) are about 30% of total, while the next two groups (25-44) look like added together they’re a bit over 40%. Another website breaks down the same Ad Planner age data a bit differently and shows that people over 35 are 47% of Tumblr users. (13-17=8%; 18-34=45%). Compared to Facebook, where 66% of users are over 35, Tumblr definitely has a younger set of users. The average age, however, is still around going to be around 34 years old. No matter how you slice it,Tumblr is younger than most other social media sites, but not as young as you might think it is.

In terms of gender, the surveys only gathered data on male and female.Tumblr has 62% women, a fairly higher amount of women than Facebook (57%). but not nearly as much as Pinterest or Blogger.

So, while it’s fair to say that Tumblr is a more “youthful” site than most other social media sites, the idea that the “average” Tumblr user is in the youngest age group is incorrect.

I’m extremely curious about all this and this is my first inquiry into the topic. I haven’t even looked into the academic literature yet. So this is sort of a first look. I’ll definitely post about it when I find a properly designed, peer reviewed and published survey on the matter.

Source of graphs and information 

Additional information

It’d be interesting to see if any of this could be broken down based on non-binary, non-reporting, etc.

I’M THE NORM

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN MY LIFE

I AM THE N O R M

(via bronzedragon)

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

(via nerdfighterfc)

get to know me meme: favorite female characters [5/5] → Tami Taylor

"Okay, don’t call me lady. Hate that. Thanks so much."

(via meatheadmanning)

You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers.

i do augustus, i do.

(via warrner)

Everywhere. That word hung in the air awhile. We both knew what it meant. 

(via gaystarwhales)

Dylan O’Brien + his pillow

(via emissarytoanalpha)

Through dangers untold and hardships unnumbered, I have fought my way here to the castle beyond the Goblin City to take back the child that you have stolen, for my will is as strong as yours, and my kingdom as great — You have no power over me.

(via evil-bones-mccoy)

isobelstevenz:

make me choose » jennyburtons asked: allison argent or lorelai gilmore

i stopped being a child the minute the strip turned pink, okay? i had to figure out how to live.

(via gatheroutofstardust)

John Krasinski’s Ice Bucket Challenge (off-screen cameo from Emily Blunt)

(via imsirius)

x

(via imsirius)

Yes, her show’s hugely funny but she’s clearly an actor.

(via oodlyenough)

Clark was supposed to cry in the scene after the death of his daughter. It worried him for days before he was to do the scene as he’d never cried on the screen before. He didn’t think it was masculine for a man to cry. One day he confided in me, “Olivia, I can’t do it. I’m just going to have to quit.” I talked with him and convinced him that the tears denoted strength of character, not weakness. It turned out to be one of the most memorable scenes in the movie. Clark always underrated himself as an actor. I think his Rhett Butler will live forever as one of the screen’s classic performances ~ Olivia De Havilland 

(via beepboopboopbeep)

puckling:

carryonstarkid:

Just watching Girl Meets World when I noticed something

image

Take a closer look

image

Sound Familiar?

image

im not crying youre crying

WAIT THIS SERIES IS AIRING? HOW CAN I WATCH THIS? THE INTERNET I DON’T THINK YOU UNDERSTAND, I NEED IT IN MY FACE. 

(via fearourfourthline)